MADISON, GA'S HISTORIC CEMETERIES

Madison New Cemetery

SARAH BEATRICE SMITH VASON

MRS S.B. VASON DEAD The End Came Saturday Morning at One O'Clock - Interment Sunday

Saturday morning at one o'clock at her home in this city occurred the death of Mrs. S.B. Vason, after a lingering illness. She had been seriously sick for a long while, and her death was not unexpected. .... Interment was in the family plot at the city cemetery.

Sarah Beatrice Smith was born in Morgan County, October 23, 1840, her parents being Guy Smith and Jane Clark. She was the last of a large family, her brothers and sisters being William Guy Williams, Thomas Henry Smith, Mrs. J.W. Robson, Joseph Clark Smith, Mrs. L.T. Campbell, Junius Pope Smith, Mrs. John Shields, Mary Elizabeth Smith. The subject of this sketch graduated in 1856 from the Madison Methodist College.

On the anniversary of her twentieth birthday, she was united in marriage to William W. Shepherd in Madison. After a few years residence in Linden, Texas, they returned to Madison. To them were born two children - Edgar, who died in infancy, and Mr. William E. Shepherd, of this city.

Several years after the death of her first husband she was married to Joseph Vason on Oct. 5, 1869. To them were born three children, all of whom survive her - G.K., Joseph and Cornelius Vason. The grandchildren are Sue Reid, Joseph, Cornelius, and Carlyle Vason.

Nephews and nieces who survive her are W.S. Shields, Birmingham, Ala.,; Mrs. Maggie Shields Bishop, Sheffield, Ala., Mrs. Sidney Frazier and Miss Sallie Smith, Union Springs, Ala., Mrs. Tommy Smith Flowers, Montgomery, Ala., Mrs. Nelle Stapp, San Antonio, Texas; Mrs. William Schley Howard, Kirkwood, Ga.; Mrs. J.P. DuVinage, Chicago, Ill.

Early in life, Mrs. Vason united with the Methodist church, and was always one of its strongest supporters and defenders, and a most useful member. She had taught a Sunday School class for more than a quarter of a century, and members of the present class and members in former years attended the funeral in a body.

Mrs. Vason belonged to the old regime of cultured and strong-minded women, and lived much in the past. Her going away ended a long, useful and well-spent life.

From The Madisonian, March 19, 1915

Linked to: www.findagrave.com/memorial/70923680